ESTONIAN ACADEMY
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eesti teaduste
akadeemia kirjastus
PUBLISHED
SINCE 1997
 
TRAMES cover
TRAMES. A Journal of the Humanities and Social Sciences
ISSN 1736-7514 (Electronic)
ISSN 1406-0922 (Print)
Impact Factor (2020): 0.5

NEURAL GRAFTING: IMPLICATIONS FOR PERSONAL IDENTITY AND PERSONALITY; pp. 168–178

Full article in PDF format | DOI: 10.3176/tr.2011.2.05

Authors
Tuija Takala, Tom Buller

Abstract
It is often suggested that advances in neurosciences will force us to re-think our customary notions of personal identity and personality. In this paper, we study a number of philosophical positions on these notions, especially in connection with mentally degenerative illnesses and neural grafting. We conclude that while the possible future treat­ments are likely to change the personalities and personal identities of patients, these changes will not pose any new challenges to the notions of personal identity and personality.
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