ESTONIAN ACADEMY
PUBLISHERS
eesti teaduste
akadeemia kirjastus
PUBLISHED
SINCE 1997
 
TRAMES cover
TRAMES. A Journal of the Humanities and Social Sciences
ISSN 1736-7514 (Electronic)
ISSN 1406-0922 (Print)
Impact Factor (2020): 0.5

NEUROSCIENCE, FREE WILL AND MORAL RESPONSIBILITY; pp. 147–155

Full article in PDF format | DOI: 10.3176/tr.2011.2.03

Author
Gardar Árnason

Abstract
Neuroscientific challenges to free will work on at least three levels: there is a metaphysical level, an epistemological level, and an empirical level. In this paper I discuss the main neuroscientific challenges on each of these three levels. Three fundamental conditions for free will can also be placed on these levels, and I briefly discuss how these conditions can be met in the context of the neuroscientific challenges. In conclusion I strongly doubt that neuroscientific evidence can show free will not to exist at all.
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